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Located in Green Bay, in the north central region of the province, this trail crosses forests and bogs before climbing steeply to an elevation of about 1,000 feet. It covers eight kilometres and will take three to four hours to complete, forming a loop so there’s minimal backtracking. Stairs on the steep and long sections of boardwalk over the bogs help you to navigate the terrain—it’s clear that a lot of effort has gone into building the trail. Be sure to include the various side trails: you’ll see impressive waterfalls. Start early enough to stop for lunch at the summit lookout, providing scenic vistas in all directions. To the east you can see down into Green Bay and King’s Point: rolling hills stretch out to the west.

Located in Green Bay, in the north central region of the province, this trail crosses forests and bogs before climbing steeply to an elevation of about 1,000 feet. It covers eight kilometres and will take three to four hours to complete, forming a loop so there’s minimal backtracking. Stairs on the steep and long sections of boardwalk over the bogs help you to navigate the terrain—it’s clear that a lot of effort has gone into building the trail. Be sure to include the various side trails: you’ll see impressive waterfalls. Start early enough to stop for lunch at the summit lookout, providing scenic vistas in all directions. To the east you can see down into Green Bay and King’s Point: rolling hills stretch out to the west.

The trail, which is well marked and starts in the community of King’s Point, across from the softball field, is named for Alexander Murray, the first director of the Geological Survey of Newfoundland (1864-1883). He wrote glowingly about the area: “To anyone in search of the picturesque, this great inlet has many rare attractions, in the varying outline and diversified scenery it presents on all sides. It’s bounded on the north side by a succession of lofty and near vertical cliffs… and to the south by gently swelling hills and valleys richly carpeted by a luxurious growth of mixed forest. All provide a landscape an artist might revel in, with scenes to charm the tourist or traveller…”

Fine words from someone who, as a lieutenant in the Royal Navy, had seen much of the world and wasn’t prone to lavish praise—and they’re as true today as when they were written, many years ago.

Eco-friendly hiking tips:

  • Pack out what you pack in. Use the waste receptacle at the start/end of the trail.
  • If you take your dog keep it on its leash, so it won’t harass the wildlife.
  • Stay on the trail to avoid trampling fragile, low-lying vegetation.

GPS coordinates

  • 0558152 N
  • 5492107 E
  • NAD. 83

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